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JavaRebel 2.0 Pricing and Licensing Changes

As JavaRebel 2.0 is nearing its release we have a few announcements to make.

First of all we would like to thank all our current users. It’s sometimes been a rocky ride and JavaRebel got where it is now thanks to your feedback, devotion and support. We are very grateful to you for everything and hope that together we can make JavaRebel even greater.

Secondly, we’d like to announce that after 9th March the perpetual licenses will no longer be available for sale. The current perpetual license owners can continue to use them and will get this and all future upgrades for free.

Finally, on the same date we will be changing the price of the annual licenses. The details will become available later, but the price will definitely go up, not down. So if you want to take advantage of the current price you better do that before that date.

Thanks again to all our current users, you have made this possible!

  • None Important

    I am very dissapointed by this move. I reccomended your product to many of my friends and I always spoke of you as an example of a small company with a good product, good licencing options and good pricing policy. And now this…

    I know you are targeting the corporate market and I am sure you don’t care too much about one or two lost sales from people like me. Though, it doesn’t matter, only time will tell if this was a good or bad move for Zero Turnaround.

  • None Important

    I am very dissapointed by this move. I reccomended your product to many of my friends and I always spoke of you as an example of a small company with a good product, good licencing options and good pricing policy. And now this…

    I know you are targeting the corporate market and I am sure you don’t care too much about one or two lost sales from people like me. Though, it doesn’t matter, only time will tell if this was a good or bad move for Zero Turnaround.

  • Just to clarify – if you currently hold a perpetual license, it will continue to remain valid with future releases, right? It’s just that after March 9, you’ll no longer be able to purchase new perpetual licenses.

    So, if you want more perpetual license, just buy them before March 9! :)

  • Just to clarify – if you currently hold a perpetual license, it will continue to remain valid with future releases, right? It’s just that after March 9, you’ll no longer be able to purchase new perpetual licenses.

    So, if you want more perpetual license, just buy them before March 9! :)

  • @None Important

    While the price changes are disappointing, it’s not entirely unreasonable. JavaRebel is a great product, is it unusual to expect that its developers would want to actually profit from it? :-) By way of comparison, InteliiJ IDEA is over $500 for a *single* license good for one version. JavaRebel has always been more of a productivity boost than IDEA, so why should we complain if it is no longer a fifth of the price?

  • @None Important

    While the price changes are disappointing, it’s not entirely unreasonable. JavaRebel is a great product, is it unusual to expect that its developers would want to actually profit from it? :-) By way of comparison, InteliiJ IDEA is over $500 for a *single* license good for one version. JavaRebel has always been more of a productivity boost than IDEA, so why should we complain if it is no longer a fifth of the price?

  • @None Important

    We are sorry to disappoint you, and do hope that it won’t stop you from enjoying our product further. However unlike most other tools JavaRebel effectively saves our users some easily countable cash and then some. We will set the price so that even with the most conservative estimates JavaRebel would pay for itself in a month leaving the rest of the year for gravy (it’s not far off from the current price point). So it seems only fair that we also charge yearly. In fact since we provide a full refund with no questions asked during thirty days, if you don’t feel that JavaRebel is commercially effective you can just drop it with no harm done.

  • @None Important

    We are sorry to disappoint you, and do hope that it won’t stop you from enjoying our product further. However unlike most other tools JavaRebel effectively saves our users some easily countable cash and then some. We will set the price so that even with the most conservative estimates JavaRebel would pay for itself in a month leaving the rest of the year for gravy (it’s not far off from the current price point). So it seems only fair that we also charge yearly. In fact since we provide a full refund with no questions asked during thirty days, if you don’t feel that JavaRebel is commercially effective you can just drop it with no harm done.

  • @Matthew

    Yes, the currently held perpetual and annual licenses will continue to be valid for all future releases. Upgrades will continue to be free as before.

  • @Matthew

    Yes, the currently held perpetual and annual licenses will continue to be valid for all future releases. Upgrades will continue to be free as before.

  • @Daniel

    Thanks for you support!

  • @Daniel

    Thanks for you support!

  • florin

    Class reloading is the single most needed feature for java development.

    Sun is as dumb as a door knob not to recognize the countless developers that were lost to PHP or other scripting languages for this single reason alone.

    When I came across JavaRebel I bought it in a heartbeat and will buy it again and again.

    If you don’t use / buy JavaRebel your critical thinking abilities should disqualify you as a programmer. Or, maybe you’re not one anyways.

    And if you want things for free, really, I have work for you. Just don’t expect a pay.

    Thanks zeroturnaround! Keep it up.

  • florin

    Class reloading is the single most needed feature for java development.

    Sun is as dumb as a door knob not to recognize the countless developers that were lost to PHP or other scripting languages for this single reason alone.

    When I came across JavaRebel I bought it in a heartbeat and will buy it again and again.

    If you don’t use / buy JavaRebel your critical thinking abilities should disqualify you as a programmer. Or, maybe you’re not one anyways.

    And if you want things for free, really, I have work for you. Just don’t expect a pay.

    Thanks zeroturnaround! Keep it up.

  • Rudyard K. Prab

    I was investigating your product for my own personal use, and yearly subscription licensing is an enormous turn-off.

    I absolutely don’t mind paying for good tools, but your move to a subscription model puts you in a very poor light — if I choose to purchase JavaRebel, I will continue looking for an alternative — any alternative — and will happily jump ship the minute one appears.

  • Rudyard K. Prab

    I was investigating your product for my own personal use, and yearly subscription licensing is an enormous turn-off.

    I absolutely don’t mind paying for good tools, but your move to a subscription model puts you in a very poor light — if I choose to purchase JavaRebel, I will continue looking for an alternative — any alternative — and will happily jump ship the minute one appears.

  • David Booth

    @Florin, Daniel, & Matthew – guys, thanks for the support. There are bound to be folks upset anytime a company changes their pricing model (even if they lower their pricing eg: “Awww man! I just paid full price 6 months ago!”), so it helps to have guys like you who see JavaRebel for what it is: a great tool that’s still a bargain. We’re aiming to ensure it pays for itself within the first month of use, and Jevgeni has even announced that we’ll provide a full refund within 30 days if you feel it’s not worth it. Considering you can use the tool free for 30 to try it, and then take 30 more to evaluate it and still get cash back, that’s pretty cool.

    @Rudy – Matthew made a good point: you can still dodge the yearly subscription licensing and get free upgrades for as long as you live and code. Just pick up a perpetual license before March 9th.

    @ None Important – as cheesy as it sounds, we do want your feedback, and we’re glad you’re sharing your views with us. (that’s why comments are enabled for all our posts – even these ones).

    If you’re telling people how awesome JavaRebel is, and you want to give me an earfull about this price change – feel free to ping me directly on skype at davidgbooth.

  • David Booth

    @Florin, Daniel, & Matthew – guys, thanks for the support. There are bound to be folks upset anytime a company changes their pricing model (even if they lower their pricing eg: “Awww man! I just paid full price 6 months ago!”), so it helps to have guys like you who see JavaRebel for what it is: a great tool that’s still a bargain. We’re aiming to ensure it pays for itself within the first month of use, and Jevgeni has even announced that we’ll provide a full refund within 30 days if you feel it’s not worth it. Considering you can use the tool free for 30 to try it, and then take 30 more to evaluate it and still get cash back, that’s pretty cool.

    @Rudy – Matthew made a good point: you can still dodge the yearly subscription licensing and get free upgrades for as long as you live and code. Just pick up a perpetual license before March 9th.

    @ None Important – as cheesy as it sounds, we do want your feedback, and we’re glad you’re sharing your views with us. (that’s why comments are enabled for all our posts – even these ones).

    If you’re telling people how awesome JavaRebel is, and you want to give me an earfull about this price change – feel free to ping me directly on skype at davidgbooth.

  • Rudyard K. Prab

    Thanks for the reply. Just to be clear, I think JavaRebel is great — today, I incorporated it into our project via a scala:console-based REPL, so you can interact with the system live, as well as automatically reload classes.

    That said, the question isn’t whether I can get “perpetual” licensing now, but rather, what happens a year from now when you raise your prices again, and we’re forced to renew our “subscription”.

    I’ve learned better than to make a significant investment in companies that have gone “enterprise” and decided to move to subscription (and, eventually, much higher) pricing. No offense, but that behavior doesn’t instill trust.

  • Rudyard K. Prab

    Thanks for the reply. Just to be clear, I think JavaRebel is great — today, I incorporated it into our project via a scala:console-based REPL, so you can interact with the system live, as well as automatically reload classes.

    That said, the question isn’t whether I can get “perpetual” licensing now, but rather, what happens a year from now when you raise your prices again, and we’re forced to renew our “subscription”.

    I’ve learned better than to make a significant investment in companies that have gone “enterprise” and decided to move to subscription (and, eventually, much higher) pricing. No offense, but that behavior doesn’t instill trust.

  • Rudyard K. Prab

    Sorry — to be clear, I’m aware that *I* can buy a perpetual license now, but that won’t hold true for future licenses purchased. =)

  • Rudyard K. Prab

    Sorry — to be clear, I’m aware that *I* can buy a perpetual license now, but that won’t hold true for future licenses purchased. =)

  • I am very dissapointed by this move. I reccomended your product to many of my friends and I always spoke of you as an example of a small company with a good product, good licencing options and good pricing policy. And now this…

    I was expecting you to give the product away for free or even considering the fact that you take up some of my valuable time, to pay me to use your product. Considering my time spent in reading your documentation and setting configuration, I should be paid as an active participant with your companies processes, in other words I am a part time employee participating in your product. I would also be a alternative marketing source sharing valuable knowledge about your product with other developers, hence a cooperative approach would result in a reasonable payment for myself.

    In the future I fully expect a more proactive and responsible position for product endorsement through alternative marketing schemes by paying your customers for the opportunity to use your product. It is a common sense approach towards a flexible competitive advantage which I’m sure a high value consensus of empowerment would lead towards a aggressive timeline of progress based upon these key indicators.

    I look forward to your continued synergy on this key issue.

  • I am very dissapointed by this move. I reccomended your product to many of my friends and I always spoke of you as an example of a small company with a good product, good licencing options and good pricing policy. And now this…

    I was expecting you to give the product away for free or even considering the fact that you take up some of my valuable time, to pay me to use your product. Considering my time spent in reading your documentation and setting configuration, I should be paid as an active participant with your companies processes, in other words I am a part time employee participating in your product. I would also be a alternative marketing source sharing valuable knowledge about your product with other developers, hence a cooperative approach would result in a reasonable payment for myself.

    In the future I fully expect a more proactive and responsible position for product endorsement through alternative marketing schemes by paying your customers for the opportunity to use your product. It is a common sense approach towards a flexible competitive advantage which I’m sure a high value consensus of empowerment would lead towards a aggressive timeline of progress based upon these key indicators.

    I look forward to your continued synergy on this key issue.

  • @phil

    lol :) Thanks :)

  • @phil

    lol :) Thanks :)

  • Rudyard K. Prab

    @phil/@Jevgeni

    Lame. The problem isn’t paying for tools, the problem is subscription-licensed software.

  • Rudyard K. Prab

    @phil/@Jevgeni

    Lame. The problem isn’t paying for tools, the problem is subscription-licensed software.

  • None Important

    Rudyard put it right. My first comment was not about the price change but about the move to a subscription based licensing.

    @Jevgeni

    It really is lame to mock your own customers.

  • None Important

    Rudyard put it right. My first comment was not about the price change but about the move to a subscription based licensing.

    @Jevgeni

    It really is lame to mock your own customers.

  • @Rudy, None Important

    I’m not trying to mock anyone, but the comment was funny. Very good style from beginning to end. Whether relevant or not it definitely deserves a laugh.

    As for the issue itself, it’s definitely a valid concern and I’d suggest you to take up Booth on his offer and ping him in Skype (he’s responsible for marketing now). Nothing is written in stone yet, and if we feel that the community concerns are valid and compatible with our business we can still keep the perpetual licenses in some form.

  • @Rudy, None Important

    I’m not trying to mock anyone, but the comment was funny. Very good style from beginning to end. Whether relevant or not it definitely deserves a laugh.

    As for the issue itself, it’s definitely a valid concern and I’d suggest you to take up Booth on his offer and ping him in Skype (he’s responsible for marketing now). Nothing is written in stone yet, and if we feel that the community concerns are valid and compatible with our business we can still keep the perpetual licenses in some form.

  • Just to be clear, I’m the one *mocking* the customer if you want to see it that way but I’d prefer u just relax, and I DON’T work for Javarebel, however I do enjoy their product.

  • Just to be clear, I’m the one *mocking* the customer if you want to see it that way but I’d prefer u just relax, and I DON’T work for Javarebel, however I do enjoy their product.

  • Rudyard K. Prab

    I suggest you spend more time on integration implementations and improving your usage and developer documentation, and less time on enterprise marketing and sales gimmicks.

    I was able to integrate JavaRebel with Restlet+Scala — and the results speak for themselves, and I’m happy to purchaselicenses. However, if I wasn’t already sold on “zero turnaround”, I would have given up — the documentation was very poor, and I had to dig through a fair bit of your SDK code to even get started. The whole end-developer experience could use a -lot- more polish.

    As a potential customer, trying to milk us for more money with subscription licensing is a huge turn-off. Instead, write and polish the documentation, make integration a snap, and improve the developer experience. If the value is clear and integration is easy, we’ll buy the product.

  • Rudyard K. Prab

    I suggest you spend more time on integration implementations and improving your usage and developer documentation, and less time on enterprise marketing and sales gimmicks.

    I was able to integrate JavaRebel with Restlet+Scala — and the results speak for themselves, and I’m happy to purchaselicenses. However, if I wasn’t already sold on “zero turnaround”, I would have given up — the documentation was very poor, and I had to dig through a fair bit of your SDK code to even get started. The whole end-developer experience could use a -lot- more polish.

    As a potential customer, trying to milk us for more money with subscription licensing is a huge turn-off. Instead, write and polish the documentation, make integration a snap, and improve the developer experience. If the value is clear and integration is easy, we’ll buy the product.

  • @Rudyard

    All very valid points. In fact these are some of the reasons we brought on David.

    BTW did you take a look at the installation manual in 2.0 distribution? We reworked it to be more friendly and we would love to hear your feedback.

    We are also reworking the whole community section in/after 2.0 to make developing plugins friendlier. If you could share more of your story about the Restlet+Scala integration, it’d definitely make it easier for us. Making good documentation is quite a challenge in itself and the more stories like that we have the better we understand what to bring out. Perhaps I could contact you privately somehow or vice virsa? My email and IM is ekabanov at gmail dot com.

  • @Rudyard

    All very valid points. In fact these are some of the reasons we brought on David.

    BTW did you take a look at the installation manual in 2.0 distribution? We reworked it to be more friendly and we would love to hear your feedback.

    We are also reworking the whole community section in/after 2.0 to make developing plugins friendlier. If you could share more of your story about the Restlet+Scala integration, it’d definitely make it easier for us. Making good documentation is quite a challenge in itself and the more stories like that we have the better we understand what to bring out. Perhaps I could contact you privately somehow or vice virsa? My email and IM is ekabanov at gmail dot com.

  • Dean

    Just to clarify – can I still buy a personal perpetual license before March 9 and get v2.0 and all future upgrades for free?

  • Dean

    Just to clarify – can I still buy a personal perpetual license before March 9 and get v2.0 and all future upgrades for free?

  • A fellow programmer tipped me on JavaRebel a while ago, claiming that the low cost and increased productivity outweighed most of the inconveniences. Today I decided to have a look on the product. It all seemed very promising until I read about the new license.

    Sorry, but I’m not trying your product while that license is still around. Good luck on acquiring future customers!

  • A fellow programmer tipped me on JavaRebel a while ago, claiming that the low cost and increased productivity outweighed most of the inconveniences. Today I decided to have a look on the product. It all seemed very promising until I read about the new license.

    Sorry, but I’m not trying your product while that license is still around. Good luck on acquiring future customers!

  • Daniel Serodio

    Your product seems great, but the move to subscription-based license really sucks…
    It can be good for corporations, but it’s unfeasible for the individual developer…

  • Daniel Serodio

    Your product seems great, but the move to subscription-based license really sucks…
    It can be good for corporations, but it’s unfeasible for the individual developer…

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